Monday, 8 April 2013

Milla Jovovich wiki and pics

Milla Jovovich wiki and pics

Milla Jovovich is an American model, actress, musician, and fashion designer born on December 17, 1975. During her career, she has appeared in a number of science fiction and action-themed films, earning her the sobriquet "reigning queen of kick-butt" from the music channel VH1 in 2006.[3]
Jovovich began modeling when Herb Ritts photographed her for the cover of the Italian magazine Lei ("She") in 1987.[4][5] Richard Avedon then featured her in Revlon's "Most Unforgettable Women in the World" advertisements and she also appeared in campaigns for L'Oréal cosmetics, Banana Republic, Christian Dior, Donna Karan, and Versace. In 1988, she made her first professional acting appearance in the television film The Night Train to Kathmandu and, later that year, she appeared in her first feature film, Two Moon Junction. After a few more lower-profile film and television appearances, such as in the Married... with Children episode "Fair Exchange" (1989)[6] as a French girl, Jovovich gained notoriety following her appearance in the 1991 romance film Return to the Blue Lagoon. In 1992 and 1993, she appeared as Christian Slater's character's love interest in Kuffs and as one of the teenagers in the comedy coming-of-age film Dazed and Confused, before her breakthrough alongside Bruce Willis and Gary Oldman in the 1997 Luc Besson science-fiction film The Fifth Element. She then appeared as the central character Joan of Arc in The Messenger: The Story of Joan of Arc (1999), also directed by Besson, who was then her husband.
In 2002, Jovovich starred in the film adaptation of the video game Resident Evil, which, although disliked by critics,[7][8] proved very successful.[9] To date, four sequels have followed in which she has reprised her role of Alice: Resident Evil: Apocalypse (2004), Resident Evil: Extinction (2007), Resident Evil: Afterlife (2010)[10] and Resident Evil: Retribution (2012).
Jovovich released a music album, The Divine Comedy, in 1994. She continues to release demos for other songs on her official website and contributes to film soundtracks. She has yet, however, to release another album. In 2003, she and model Carmen Hawk created the clothing line Jovovich-Hawk. It ceased operations in early 2008.[11] Prior to its demise, its items could be found at Fred Segal in Los Angeles, Harvey Nichols and over fifty other stores around the world.[citation needed]
Jovovich now has her own production company, Creature Entertainment.[12]

 Early life and family

Milla Jovovich was born in Kiev, Ukrainian SSR, former Soviet Union, the daughter of Bogić Jovović, a Serbian[13][14] pediatrician, and Galina Jovovich (née Loginova), a Russian[15][16] stage actress. She was raised in the Russian Orthodox religion.[17]
Milla's paternal family's estate was in Zlopek near Peć. Her paternal great-grandfather, Bogić Camić Jovović, was a flag-bearer of the Vasojevići clan and an officer in the guard of King Nicholas I of Montenegro; his wife's name was Milica, after whom Milla was named. Her paternal grandfather, Bogdan Jovović, was a commander in the Pristina military area, and later investigated finances in the military areas of Skopje and Sarajevo, where he uncovered massive gold embezzlement. He was punished for refusing to convict a friend of the crime. Later, the government briefly imprisoned him in Goli otok for refusing to testify. When he feared that he could be arrested again, he escaped to Albania and later moved to Kiev. A different version of the story claims that he was the one who took the gold. Milla's father, Bogić, later joined Bogdan in Kiev, where he and his sister graduated in medicine.[18] In 2000, her grandfather, Bogdan Jovović, died in Kiev.[19] Her mother was born in Tuapse (now in Russia) but moved in her childhood to Dnipropetrovsk (now in Ukraine).[20] Her mother played a part in several films, including Vykrutasy, and the upcoming American silent movie Silent Life (2012).
In 1980, when Milla was five years old, her family left the Soviet Union for political reasons[21] and moved to London. They subsequently moved to Sacramento, California, settling in Los Angeles seven months later. Milla's parents divorced soon after their arrival in Los Angeles.
In 1988, as a result of her father's relationship with a woman from Argentina,[22] Milla's half-brother[23] Marco Jovovich, was born.[24] Milla's mother attempted to support the family with acting jobs, but found little success, and eventually resorted to cleaning houses to earn money. Her mother and father both provided cooking and cleaning services for director Brian De Palma.[25] Milla's father was incarcerated for participating in an illegal operation concerning medical insurance; he was given a 20-year sentence in 1994,[26] but was released in 1999 after serving five years in an American prison.[19][27] According to Milla, "Prison was good for him. He's become a much better person. It gave him a chance to stop and think."[28]
Milla attended public schools in Los Angeles, and became fluent in English in three months (as is common with young children).[29] In school, she was teased by classmates because she had emigrated from the Soviet Union during the Cold War: "I was called a commie and a Russian spy. I was never, ever, ever accepted into the crowd."[30] At age 12, in seventh grade, Milla left school to focus on modeling.[31] She has stated that she was rebellious during her early teens, engaging in drug use, shopping mall vandalism, and credit-card fraud.[28] In 1994, she became a U.S. citizen.[32]
 Modeling career

At the age of nine, Jovovich began going to modeling auditions.[25] She was discovered by Gene Lemuel, who shot test photos of her and later showed them to Herb Ritts in LA.[4] The next day Ritts booked her for the cover of Lei, an Italian magazine.[4] After Jovovich booked Lei, she was signed by Prima Modeling Agency[33] then Richard Avedon hired her for Mademoiselle.[4] Avedon was head of marketing at Revlon at the time, and chose Jovovich to appear with models Alexa Singer and Sandra Zatezalo in Revlon's "Most Unforgettable Women in the World" advertisements.[34] In 1988, she made her first professional model contract.[21] Jovovich was among other models who ignited controversy by becoming involved in the industry at a young age.[35]
Later, Jovovich made it to the cover of The Face, which led to new contracts and covers of Vogue and Cosmopolitan.[21] Since then, she has graced over one hundred magazine covers, including Seventeen, Mademoiselle, Glamour, Harper's Bazaar, and InStyle.[36] Her modeling career has included various campaigns for Banana Republic, Christian Dior, Damiani, Donna Karan, Gap, Versace, Calvin Klein, DKNY, Coach, Giorgio Armani, H&M, and Revlon. Since 1998, Jovovich has been an "international spokesmodel" for L'Oréal cosmetics. She also had a minor cameo in Bret Easton Ellis' novel Glamorama, a satire of society's obsession with celebrities and beauty.[37]
In an article published in 2002, she was said to be Miuccia Prada's muse[35] and in an article published in 2003, Harpers & Queen magazine claimed Jovovich was Gianni Versace's "favourite supermodel".[12] In 2004, Jovovich topped Forbes magazine's "Richest Supermodels of the World" list, earning a reported $10.5 million.[15] In 2006, Jovovich was picked up by Spanish clothing line Mango as their new spokesmodel and is currently featured in their ad campaigns;[38] she can also be seen in advertisements for Etro. She has noted that "Modeling was never a priority"[39] and it instead enables her "to be selective about the creative decisions [she] make[s]".[12]
 Acting career

 Early work (1985–1993)
Jovovich's mother had "raised [her] to be a movie star"[28] and in 1985, enrolled Jovovich in the Professional Actors school in California.[21][40][41]
In 1988, she appeared in her first professional role in the made-for-television film The Night Train to Kathmandu as Lily McLeod. Later that year, she made her debut in a theatrically released picture with a small role, as Samantha Delongpre, in the romantic thriller Two Moon Junction. Following roles on the television series Paradise (1988), Married... with Children (1989) and Parker Lewis Can't Lose (1990), Jovovich was cast as the lead as Lilli Hargrave in Return to the Blue Lagoon (1991). This sequel to The Blue Lagoon (1980) placed her opposite Brian Krause. Return to the Blue Lagoon led to comparisons between her and child model-turned-actress, Brooke Shields (who had starred in the original)—Jovovich was often called by press the "Slavic Brooke Shields".[42] The role also gained her controversy, much like Shields gained in The Blue Lagoon, for appearing nude at a young age.[30] For her portrayal of Lilli Hargrave, Jovovich was nominated for both "Best Young Actress Starring in a Motion Picture" at the 1991 Young Artist Awards, and "Worst New Star" at the 1991 Golden Raspberry Awards.[43]
In 1992, Milla Jovovich co-starred with Christian Slater in the comedy Kuffs. Later that year, she portrayed Mildred Harris in the Charlie Chaplin biographical film Chaplin. 1993 saw Jovovich in the Richard Linklater cult film Dazed and Confused, in which she played Michelle Burroughs, on screen girlfriend to Pickford (played by her then real life boyfriend Shawn Andrews). Jovovich was heavily featured in the promotional material for the film, however, upon the film's release, she was upset to find her role was considerably trimmed from the original script.[42] The bulk of Jovovich's role was to be shot on the last day of filming; however, she was misinformed of the date, and ultimately had one line in the film, "No", in addition to singing a line from "The Alien Song" from her album, The Divine Comedy.[44] Discouraged, she took a hiatus from acting roles,[45] during which time she moved to Europe and began focusing on a music career.

Breakthrough (1997–2001)

Jovovich returned to acting in 1997 with a lead in the Luc Besson-directed science fiction action film The Fifth Element, alongside Bruce Willis and Gary Oldman. She portrayed Leeloo, an alien who was the "supreme being". Jovovich said she "worked like hell: no band practice, no clubs, no pot, nothing"[46] to acquire the role and impress Besson, whom she married on December 14, 1997, but later divorced. Jovovich also co-created and mastered an alien language of over 400 words for her role.[42] She wore a costume that came to be known as the "ACE-bandage" costume, a revealing body suit made of medical bandages designed by Jean-Paul Gaultier.[42][47] The Fifth Element was selected as the opening film for the 1997 Cannes Film Festival and its worldwide box office gross was over $263 million, more than three times its budget of $80 million.[48] The Fifth Element was often praised for its visual style and unique costumes, and film reviewer James Berardinelli, explained "Jovovich makes an impression, although her effectiveness has little to do with acting and less to do with dialogue".[49] Jovovich was nominated for "Favorite Female Newcomer" at the Blockbuster Entertainment Awards and "Best Fight" at the MTV Movie Awards.[43] Jovovich's portrayal of Leeloo inspired a video game and a planned action figure, but the figure was never released due to licensing problems.[50] In a 2003 interview, Jovovich said Leeloo was her favorite role to portray.[51]
In 1998, Jovovich had a role in the Spike Lee drama He Got Game as abused prostitute Dakota Burns, appearing with Denzel Washington and Ray Allen. In 1999, she appeared in the music video for the song "If You Can't Say No" by Lenny Kravitz. In 1999, Jovovich returned to the action genre playing the title role in The Messenger: The Story of Joan of Arc, reuniting her with director Luc Besson. She was featured in armor throughout several extensive battle scenes, and cut her hair to a short length for the role. Jovovich received generally good reviews for her performance, although she also received a Razzie Award nomination for "Worst Actress".[42][43] The Messenger: The Story of Joan of Arc did moderately well at the box office, gaining $66 million worldwide.[52] In 2000, Jovovich appeared as the troubled Eloise in The Million Dollar Hotel, a film based on a concept story by Bono of the band U2 and Nicholas Klein. Directed by Wim Wenders, Jovovich starred alongside Jeremy Davies and Mel Gibson, in addition to providing vocals on the film's soundtrack. Afterwards, she portrayed bar owner Lucia, in the British western film The Claim (2000), and the evil Katinka in the cameo-laced comedy Zoolander (2001).

Music career

Jovovich had begun working on a music album as early as 1988, when she was signed by SBK Records after the company heard a demo she recorded.[77] In August 1990, she asserted in an interview that the then-forthcoming album would be "a mix between Kate Bush, Sinéad O'Connor, This Mortal Coil, and the Cocteau Twins".[78] After it was initially presented by SBK strictly as a pop album, Jovovich protested, insisting on using her personal poetry for lyrics and recording her own instrumental material.[77] Jovovich had written the songs when she was fifteen, with the exception of a Ukrainian folk song, "In a Glade", that she covered. In April 1994, billed under her first name, she released The Divine Comedy, a title that was a reference to the epic poem by Dante Alighieri of the same name. Jovovich had chosen the title after seeing Russian artist Alexis Steele's proposed cover artwork sketch for the then untitled album. Jovovich found that the sketch had "all the struggle that I'm singing about. It IS the divine comedy".[77] The Divine Comedy was well received by critics, and featured pop-infused traditional Ukrainian folk songs that led to comparisons with musicians Tori Amos and Kate Bush.[25] John McAlley of Rolling Stone called the album "remarkable", "strikingly mature and rich in invention", and as featuring "angst-laced poetry with vivid melodies and arrangements that find a common spirit in synth pop, European folk and psychedelic dream rock".[79] Jovovich released the track "Gentleman Who Fell", with an accompanying music video, as the sole single from the album. The music video was originally directed by Lisa Bonet and featured Harry Dean Stanton, but Jovovich was unsatisfied with the results and decided to film another version. The second version of "Gentleman Who Fell", a homage to Maya Deren's short film Meshes of the Afternoon (1943), was subsequently played on MTV. Jovovich toured the United States during most of 1994 to promote the album, opening for Toad the Wet Sprocket and Crash Test Dummies, as well as playing smaller acoustic sets. Jovovich had opted to perform in smaller and more intimate settings, turning down a musical appearance on Saturday Night Live. Milla has also been collaborating musically with longtime friend and musician Chris Brenner, who co-wrote with her on the Divine Comedy Album and who was the musical coordinator for the supporting tour. She and Brenner met in 1993 and have been working creatively on different ventures ever since.[44] Following The Divine Comedy, she expressed interest in releasing a second album, having had ten songs ready for a future recording that was intended for a Summer 1996 release.[30][31] Despite the appearance of a lo-fi field recording The People Tree Sessions in 1998, Jovovich has yet to release a second album.
In May 1999, Jovovich along with Chris Brenner formed an experimental band called Plastic Has Memory, in which she wrote the songs, sang, and played electric guitar.[80] The band was "[m]uch heavier and darker than the vaguely Ukrainian folk-sounding elements of her first album" and had a similar sound to a grunge and trip hop Portishead.[81] Plastic Has Memory played about a dozen shows in Los Angeles and New York City for a potential Virgin Records album release,[82] one of which Mick Jagger had attended.[83] Though Plastic Has Memory was featured on Hollywood Goes Wild, a benefit celebrity compilation album, the group never formally released a record and is no longer together.[84]
Jovovich has contributed tracks to several of her film soundtracks, including The Million Dollar Hotel (2000) and Dummy (2002), and has also provided songs for the soundtracks of films in which she has not acted such as Underworld (2003) produced by musician Danny Lohner who was the bass player in Nine Inch Nails for many years. Her song "The Gentlemen Who Fell" was featured on the The Rules of Attraction soundtrack in 2002. In 2001, Jovovich was one of many celebrities whose vocals were featured in a cover of "We are Family" to raise money for the American Red Cross. She has appeared as guest vocalist on the song "Former Lover" on Deepak Chopra's album, A Gift of Love II: Oceans of Ecstasy (2002) and Legion of Boom (2004) by The Crystal Method.
Since 2003, Jovovich has worked with musician Maynard James Keenan, of Tool and A Perfect Circle, on his Industrial side project Puscifer,[85] contributing vocals to the track "REV 22:20", which was featured on various film soundtracks in its original or a remixed form.[86] As of January, 2009, she can be heard collaborating with Maynard and Danny Lohner on the Puscifer track called, "The Mission."[87] She also performed the song at the first live Puscifer performance on February 13, 2009 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Danny Lohner, and longtime music collaborator Chris Brenner currently continue to record and perform with Jovovich who has made several highly praised appearances in recent years.
Jovovich continues to write songs which she refers to as "demos", and which are provided for free in MP3 format on her official website. She provides license to freely download and remix the tracks, but reserves the right to sell and issue them.[88]
She announced via Twitter and her official website a new single called Electric Sky would be released. It was released on May 18, 2012 and it'll be part of an EP she will be releasing. The date of its release has not been announced.[89] The song was presented at the Life Ball in 2012.
 Fashion design

Jovovich and fellow model Carmen Hawk launched a line of clothing called Jovovich-Hawk in 2003. The pair opened a showroom in New York City's Greenwich Village on September 13, 2005, and the line lasted for four years. All of the dresses for Jovovich-Hawk line were designed by herself and her partner Carmen Hawk, in The atelier is based in Los Angeles, but pieces could be found at Fred Segal in Los Angeles, Harvey Nichols, and over 50 stores around the world. Vogue has praised the line for its "girl-about-town cult status most designers spend years trying to achieve."[90]
In November 2006, the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) and US Vogue nominated Jovovich-Hawk for the CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund Award. Jovovich-Hawk was nominated as a finalist, although Doo-Ri Chung took the top prize.[91]
In 2007, Jovovich and Hawk designed the costume for Jovovich's character in Resident Evil: Extinction. The shorts Alice, her character, wears are a variation on the 'Alice Star' Shorts from the Spring 2007 collection.[92] In late 2007, Jovovich-Hawk signed a deal to design a diffusion collection for Target's Go International campaign, following in the footsteps of Luella, Paul & Joe and Proenza Schouler.[93]
In late 2008, Jovovich and Hawk mutually agreed to end the business due to increased demands on their time. Jovovich explained, "I'm an artist. I'm not someone who can deal with shipping rates and taxes".[94]
In 2012, Jovovich designed and modeled a couple of capsule collection for the brand Marella, part of the Max Mara Fashion Group.

Filmography

 Film
Year Title Role Notes
1988 Two Moon Junction Samantha Delongpre
1991 Return to the Blue Lagoon Lilli Hargrave
1992 Kuffs Maya Carlton
1992 Chaplin Mildred Harris
1993 Dazed and Confused Michelle Burroughs
1997 The Fifth Element Leeloo Nominated — Razzie Award for Worst Supporting Actress
Nominated — Saturn Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated — MTV Movie Award for Best Fight Scene (Leeloo vs. the aliens)
1998 He Got Game Dakota Burns
1999 The Messenger: The Story of Joan of Arc Joan of Arc
2000 The Claim Lucia
2001 The Million Dollar Hotel Eloise
2001 Zoolander Katinka Ingabogovinanana
2002 Resident Evil Alice Nominated—Saturn Award for Best Actress
2002 You Stupid Man Nadine
2003 Dummy Fangora "Fanny" Gurkel
2003 No Good Deed Erin
2004 Resident Evil: Apocalypse Alice
2005 Gore Vidal's Caligula Drusilla Trailer / Short film
2006 Ultraviolet Violet Song jat Shariff
2007 .45 Kat
2007 Resident Evil: Extinction Alice Scream Award for Best Science Fiction Actress
2008 Palermo Shooting Herself
2009 A Perfect Getaway Cydney Anderson
2009 The Fourth Kind Dr. Abigail "Abbey" Tyler Nominated—Scream Award for Best Horror Actress
2010 Stone Lucetta Hollywood Spotlight Award for Best Actress
2010 Resident Evil: Afterlife Alice Scream Award for Best Science Fiction Actress
2010 Dirty Girl Sue-Ann
2011 Vykrutasy (Lucky Trouble) Nadya Russian film
2011 Bringing Up Bobby Olive
2011 The Three Musketeers Milady de Winter
2011 Faces in the Crowd Anna Marchant
2012 Resident Evil: Retribution Alice
 Television
Year Title Role Notes
1988 The Night Train to Kathmandu Lily McLeod (TV movie)
1988 Paradise Katie Episode "Childhood's End"
1989 Married... with Children Yvette Episode "Fair Exchange"
1990 Parker Lewis Can't Lose Robin Fecknowitz Episode "Pilot"
2002 King of the Hill Serena Episode "Get Your Freak Off"

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Milla Jovovich wiki and pics

Milla Jovovich wiki and pics

Milla Jovovich wiki and pics

Milla Jovovich wiki and pics

Milla Jovovich wiki and pics

Milla Jovovich wiki and pics

Milla Jovovich wiki and pics

Milla Jovovich wiki and pics

Milla Jovovich wiki and pics

Milla Jovovich wiki and pics

Milla Jovovich wiki and pics

Milla Jovovich wiki and pics

Milla Jovovich wiki and pics

Milla Jovovich wiki and pics

Milla Jovovich wiki and pics

Milla Jovovich wiki and pics

Milla Jovovich wiki and pics

Milla Jovovich wiki and pics

Milla Jovovich wiki and pics

Milla Jovovich wiki and pics

Milla Jovovich wiki and pics

Milla Jovovich wiki and pics


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